Heavenly Sky-blue (Or Blood-red) Summer Sauce – Historical Food Fortnightly

Medieval Blackberry Sauce Recipe - Heavenly Sky-blue (Or Blood-red) Summer Sauce - Historical Food Fortnightly

For the Historical Food Fortnightly challenge 18 – ‘Let’s get saucy!’ I tried to make  a medieval natural blue sauce. I found the recipe in different languages all over the internet: in French it’s called ‘Sauce bleu céleste d’été’, and in English ‘Heavenly sky-blue summer sauce’ or ‘Summertime cerulean blue sauce‘. It’s a 1450s or 1460s recipe from the book ‘Libro de arte coquinaria’ by Maestro Martino, which is the most influential cookbook in the 15th century. The cookbook contains mainly sauce recipes, and it’s the first book which mentions a piece of cloth to strain sauces. The cookbook is written in Latin and the recipe I’m now making is called: ‘Sapor celeste de estate’. Continue reading Heavenly Sky-blue (Or Blood-red) Summer Sauce – Historical Food Fortnightly

Victorian Nettle Beer And Kvass – Small Beer Recipes – Historical Food Fortnightly

Victorian Nettle Beer And Kvass - Small Beer Recipes - Historical Food Fortnightly

For the Historical Food Fortnightly challenge 17 – Myths and Legends, I made small beer. Small beer was drunk in medieval Europe instead of water, as water wasn’t safe to drink. Small beer contains less alcohol than beer; it was homemade; drunk by all, even children and servants, and the consistency was sometimes rather like porridge. Small beer is mentioned in “The Three Heads of the Well” by Joseph Jacobs published in English Fairy Tales in 1890: The king’s daughter says to the old man: ‘In my bag I have got bread and cheese, and in my bottle good small beer. Would you like to have some?’ Continue reading Victorian Nettle Beer And Kvass – Small Beer Recipes – Historical Food Fortnightly

Victorian Campfire Damper Recipe – Historical Food Fortnightly

Victorian Damper Recipe - Historical Food Fortnightly

Damper is an unleavened flat bread made with flour and water, which is baked in the hot ashes of a wood fire. Australian damper is called bannock or ash cake in the USA. Damper is easy to make as part of a cowboy or lumberjack breakfast.

Bacon & eggs, Victorian damper with black tea, all cooked over an open fire, is my entry for challenge 8 – Literary Foods – of the Historical Food Fortnightly. Continue reading Victorian Campfire Damper Recipe – Historical Food Fortnightly