All posts by Lina

Edwardian Coutil Corset

Edwardian Coutil Corset

‘The “W. B. Erect Form” corset gives a long, low and full effect from shoulder to bust. It is the only correct model for the new straight-front styles in costumes. It is a health corset. It is a surpassingly beautiful corset.’ (W.B. Erect Form Corset Ad, 1900)

Even though I often make historical corsets, particularly Edwardian corsets, this is the first time I used coutil – the typical corset fabric of today – and spoiler: I don’t like it! 😉 Continue reading Edwardian Coutil Corset

Historical Peasant Woman Outfit: Unboned Stays, Bumroll & Corded Petticoat

Historical Peasant Woman Outfit

If you read my blog regularly, you know that I’m more drawn to historical lower class everyday clothing, especially rural working woman costumes. This is my newest peasant woman outfit: It consists of an unbleached chemise, unboned rural stays, bumroll and dyed-by-me corded petticoat and tucked skirt. An outfit like my historical farm girl outfit would’ve been worn in the 18th century or early Victorian era. And without the bumroll the working class woman costume is even suitable for the Edwardian era. Continue reading Historical Peasant Woman Outfit: Unboned Stays, Bumroll & Corded Petticoat

9 FAQs About Dyeing Cotton Blue With Red Cabbage

Red cabbage dye sample

Red cabbage dye is my favorite natural blue dye for cotton fabric and cotton clothing! 😀 You can use red cabbage to dye cotton blue even without a mordant. Or you can make DIY iron mordant to make the color darker and to improve the wash fastness of red cabbage dyed fabric. Continue reading 9 FAQs About Dyeing Cotton Blue With Red Cabbage

13 FAQs About Eco-Friendly Natural Dyeing

If you’re just getting started with natural dyeing, here are some frequently asked questions & answers about eco-friendly and sustainable natural dyeing: The eco-friendly natural dyeing 101!

Homemade Natural Blue Food Coloring With Red Cabbage

Do you want to know how to dye your own clothes and fabric in an eco-friendly and sustainable way with natural dyes? Natural dyeing is a fun process but it’s also good for the environment. So let’s get started with natural dyeing! 😀 Continue reading 13 FAQs About Eco-Friendly Natural Dyeing

34 Types of Seams – Historical Sewing

Learn how to make 34 historical types of seams. For historical costumes and modern clothing!

34 Types of Seams Historical Sewing

The Victorians had a seam for every purpose! The following 34 historical types of seams have already been used since the Victorian era. While some types of seams are even older and have been used since the Middle Ages. You can use the following 34 historical seam finishes for your Victorian and Edwardian clothing. But of course you can also use them for your modern clothing! Continue reading 34 Types of Seams – Historical Sewing

18th Century Chintz Stays With Stomacher

18th Century Chintz Stays With Stomacher

A while ago I bought chintz cotton fabric for an 18th century dress but the fabric was too flimsy for that! So the fabric sat in my stash for a couple of years until I finally had the idea to use the fabric for 18th century stays. I had just enough fabric left because I’d already used most of the fabric for a tablecloth. 😉 Continue reading 18th Century Chintz Stays With Stomacher

17 Natural Materials To Make DIY Candle Wicks

17 natural materials you can use to make your own candle wicks at home! Learn how to make your own candle wicks with natural materials. The following 17 natural DIY candle wicks are all natural, sustainable, non-toxic (not treated with chemicals like store-bought candle wicks), easy to make, cheap, readily available and of course work as wicks for candles and oil lamps! You probably have the materials for your homemade candle wicks lying around the house or you can simply collect them in nature.

17 Natural Materials To Make DIY Candle Wicks

I love to make homemade candles and oil lamps with DIY candle wicks! Continue reading 17 Natural Materials To Make DIY Candle Wicks

Short Edwardian Tailored Black Wool Walking Skirt

Short Edwardian Tailored Black Wool Walking Skirt

‘Margery was always in black and white, short walking skirt and trim white shirt waist, freshly laundered […] There was no picture hat on her bonny brown hair, but a little black sailor with a swallow’s wing on one side and a bunch of violets in a knot of ribbon.’ (Madeira Mercury, 1907)

Because my gray Edwardian wool walking skirt is so comfortable that I wore it almost every day during the winter, I made another short Edwardian skirt with black wool broadcloth this time! Continue reading Short Edwardian Tailored Black Wool Walking Skirt

5 Ways To Attach Ruffles – Historical & Heirloom Sewing

5 Ways To Attach Ruffles - Historical Heirloom Sewing

In the Edwardian era, there were 5 ways to attach ruffles: with a receiving tuck, flat felled seam, finishing braid, French seam or whipped gathers. The first four can be sewn on a sewing machine, while the last one is sewn by hand. All these techniques have in common that the right and wrong side of your skirt looks tidy: there are no raw edges on the wrong side and the skirt is also much more durable than if you‘d use zigzagged or serged seams to attach ruffles. Continue reading 5 Ways To Attach Ruffles – Historical & Heirloom Sewing