All posts by Lina

Edwardian Shirtwaist Costume

The Edwardian shirtwaist costume was the most practical everyday attire. A shirtwaist costume consisted of a tailored skirt and a separate shirtwaist blouse.

Edwardian Shirtwaist Costume

‘With a good black skirt and two or three well made, neat and stylish shirt waists we can always manage to look well dressed.’ (San Francisco Call, 1905)

Shirtwaist costumes were basics in every Edwardian woman’s wardrobe: She could wear it every day for almost any occasion! My version of an Edwardian shirtwaist costume consist of a tailored black wool trumpet skirt, a white cotton shirtwaist (blouse), a patent leather belt with metal belt buckle, a leather chatelaine bag with metal chatelaine hook, a black tie and hair ribbon and a pink rayon taffeta petticoat – all parts of the outfit are made by me. 🙂 Continue reading Edwardian Shirtwaist Costume

Edwardian Slip With Lace Inserts – History Bounding

Edwardian Slip With Lace Inserts

The Edwardian era is my favorite historical era at the moment, that’s why I made another piece of Edwardian underwear! 😀 You could call this piece of lingerie a slip, chemise, princess slip or princess petticoat. And in the Edwardian era, it was also called ‘combination chemise and short petticoat’. It combined the corset cover and short under petticoat into one garment and was usually worn over the chemise and corset. Continue reading Edwardian Slip With Lace Inserts – History Bounding

5 Ways How To Dye With Fresh Woad Leaves

Learn how to dye with fresh woad leaves without using hazardous chemicals.

5 Ways How To Dye With Fresh Woad Leaves

After dyeing cotton fabric & clothes blue with red cabbage and black beans, my next natural dye experiment is dyeing cotton fabric blue with homegrown fresh woad leaves. However, I don’t want to use the common woad vat with hazardous chemicals. So after some internet research I found 5 promising natural woad dye recipes without hazardous chemicals: Two of them are traditional fermentation vats, one uses stale urine, one uses salt and one uses vinegar. Continue reading 5 Ways How To Dye With Fresh Woad Leaves

How To Dye With Woad & Indigo – Historical Dye Recipes

How To Dye With Woad Indigo Historical Dye Recipes

In the past, indigo, woad and pastel (a variety of woad) was used to dye wool and cotton fabric blue. Indigo and woad dye are different from other natural dyes because the dye isn’t water soluble: you have to make a vat. Today, chemicals are used to make a quick vat. In the past, however, it was usually a fermentation vat using different ingredients like bran, madder, yeast, weld, molasses, urine, potash and lime. Continue reading How To Dye With Woad & Indigo – Historical Dye Recipes

Modern 18th Century Dress – Historybounding Dress

Historybounding Modern 18th Century Dress Lace Up Boned Corset Bodice Spiral Lacing

I’m currently making some historybounding or cottagecore dresses. The dresses are inspired by historical fashion. However, they are still modern enough so that I can wear them today as summer dresses. 😀 This is one of my historybounding dresses: It’s inspired by 18th century dresses. Continue reading Modern 18th Century Dress – Historybounding Dress

Handwoven Corset Top

DIY Handwoven Corset Top

Because my modern 18th century recycled denim stays turned out so comfy I made another DIY corset top! 😀 This time I used handwoven fabric in blue and white for my corset top. The corset top laces up the back and is closed with hooks and eyes at the center front. It’s constructed using lapped seams and the old German stitch (also known as baseball stitch), and it’s unboned except for the two necessary bones at the back. Continue reading Handwoven Corset Top

Short Edwardian Cotton Dress – History Bounding

Short Edwardian Cotton Dress

Inspired by Edwardian girls’ dresses I made a short Edwardian cotton dress.  But instead of using new fabric I used one vintage apricot-colored cotton bedsheet which I dyed with blue fabric dye. And the placement of the tucks and pintucks is an almost extact copy of an antique Edwardian cotton dress. Continue reading Short Edwardian Cotton Dress – History Bounding

How To Sew A Historical Peasant Bodice

Sew a simple unboned historical peasant bodice with front lacing for historical reenactment or as modern cottagecore lace-up corset top!

Historical Working Woman Peasant Bodice Corset Top

In the past, peasants and other working women often wore simple unboned bodices or lightly boned stays. My historical working woman stays are based on antique rural stays. This historical peasant bodice features a low neckline, shoulder straps, spiral lacing at the center front and princess seams at the back. You can make it completely unboned or just lightly boned. Continue reading How To Sew A Historical Peasant Bodice