How To Dye Cotton Green With Red Hazelnut Leaves (No Mordant)

Dye cotton with red hazelnut leaves a beautiful lightfast and washfast green without mordant!

How To Dye Cotton Green With Red Hazelnut Leaves No Mordant Needed

I was so surprised when I found out that red hazelnut leaves dye cotton fabric green! 😀 Despite most plants being green, it’s difficult to dye fabric green with natural dyes. In the past, green fabric was usually first dyed yellow and then over-dyed with blue dye.

But red hazelnut leaves turn cotton fabric green in one step! Continue reading How To Dye Cotton Green With Red Hazelnut Leaves (No Mordant)

How To Dye Cotton With Black Beans (No Mordant)

How To Dye Cotton Blue With Black Beans No Mordant Needed

A couple of years ago I’ve already published a tutorial on how to dye cotton fabric blue with black beans using DIY iron mordant and a cold dyeing process. This is now a different method to dye cotton gray blue with black beans. You don’t need to mordant the fabric before dyeing it with black beans! 😀 And because it’s a hot dyeing method, it’s also a lot faster. Continue reading How To Dye Cotton With Black Beans (No Mordant)

Edwardian Unboned Sports Corset

Edwardian Unboned Sports Corset

My Edwardian unboned sports corset is my favorite corset so far: it’s so comfy! 😀 The corset is a single-layer corset made of thin pale blue cotton fabric with flat felled seams. It’s inspired by antique Edwardian unboned athletic corsets and health corsets. And even though the corset is unboned and made of thin fabric, I can lace it tighter than more heavily boned corsets made of sturdy cotton fabric like my Edwardian coutil corset! I just love how my Edwardian sports corset turned out! 😀 Continue reading Edwardian Unboned Sports Corset

50 Edwardian Pompadour Gibson Girl Hairstyles

The favorite hairstyle of Edwardian women was the pompadour hairstyle. They wore it as an everyday hairstyle and for balls and evening soirees. The basic Edwardian pompadour hairstyle is high over the forehead and close at the back with a bun at the top of the head.

50 Edwardian Gibson Girl Hairstyles

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Pompadour hairstyles became popular in the late Victorian and early Edwardian era. Almost all Edwardian women wore a variation of the pompadour coiffure. Continue reading 50 Edwardian Pompadour Gibson Girl Hairstyles

Edwardian Coutil Corset

Edwardian Coutil Corset

‘The “W. B. Erect Form” corset gives a long, low and full effect from shoulder to bust. It is the only correct model for the new straight-front styles in costumes. It is a health corset. It is a surpassingly beautiful corset.’ (W.B. Erect Form Corset Ad, 1900)

Even though I often make historical corsets, particularly Edwardian corsets, this is the first time I used coutil – the typical corset fabric of today – and spoiler: I don’t like it! 😉 Continue reading Edwardian Coutil Corset

Historical Peasant Woman Outfit: Unboned Stays, Bumroll & Corded Petticoat

Historical Peasant Woman Outfit

If you read my blog regularly, you know that I’m more drawn to historical lower class everyday clothing, especially rural working woman costumes. This is my newest peasant woman outfit: It consists of an unbleached chemise, unboned rural stays, bumroll and dyed-by-me corded petticoat and tucked skirt. An outfit like my historical farm girl outfit would’ve been worn in the 18th century or early Victorian era. And without the bumroll the working class woman costume is even suitable for the Edwardian era. Continue reading Historical Peasant Woman Outfit: Unboned Stays, Bumroll & Corded Petticoat

9 FAQs About Dyeing Cotton Blue With Red Cabbage

Red cabbage dye sample

Red cabbage dye is my favorite natural blue dye for cotton fabric and cotton clothing! 😀 You can use red cabbage to dye cotton blue even without a mordant. Or you can make DIY iron mordant to make the color darker and to improve the wash fastness of red cabbage dyed fabric. Continue reading 9 FAQs About Dyeing Cotton Blue With Red Cabbage

14 FAQs About Eco-Friendly Natural Dyeing

If you’re just getting started with natural dyeing, here are some frequently asked questions & answers about eco-friendly and sustainable natural dyeing: The eco-friendly natural dyeing 101!

Homemade Natural Blue Food Coloring With Red Cabbage

Do you want to know how to dye your own clothes and fabric in an eco-friendly and sustainable way with natural dyes? Natural dyeing is a fun process but it’s also good for the environment. So let’s get started with natural dyeing! 😀 Continue reading 14 FAQs About Eco-Friendly Natural Dyeing

34 Types of Seams – Historical Sewing

Learn how to make 34 historical types of seams. For historical costumes and modern clothing!

34 Types of Seams Historical Sewing

The Victorians had a seam for every purpose! The following 34 historical types of seams have already been used since the Victorian era. While some types of seams are even older and have been used since the Middle Ages. You can use the following 34 historical seam finishes for your Victorian and Edwardian clothing. But of course you can also use them for your modern clothing! Continue reading 34 Types of Seams – Historical Sewing

18th Century Chintz Stays With Stomacher

18th Century Chintz Stays With Stomacher

A while ago I bought chintz cotton fabric for an 18th century dress but the fabric was too flimsy for that! So the fabric sat in my stash for a couple of years until I finally had the idea to use the fabric for 18th century stays. I had just enough fabric left because I’d already used most of the fabric for a tablecloth. 😉 Continue reading 18th Century Chintz Stays With Stomacher