Tag Archives: bread

Bread Recipe With Wild Yeast – With Honey Water Or Fruit Yeast

You don’t need commercial yeast to make a delicious loaf of bread! Bake homemade bread with wild yeast from scratch. I’ll show you two alternatives to make wild yeast starter from scratch at home with fermented honey water or fruit yeast water. Bread with wild yeast starter is easy and cheap to make and so delicious – it tastes just like ordinary yeast bread or even better!

How To Make Wild Yeast Bread With Fermented Honey Water Or Fruit Yeast Water

Wild yeast bread is made by spontaneous fermentation involving wild yeasts and lactobacilli. Honey and fruit water is used to catch wild yeasts and lactobacilli which naturally leaven the bread. Wild yeast bread with fermented honey water or fruit yeast water has hardly any taste at all – a sweet and mild taste – like store-bought white bread. So start a fun kitchen science project today and bake bread with wild yeast from scratch! Continue reading Bread Recipe With Wild Yeast – With Honey Water Or Fruit Yeast

Victorian Yeast Substitute

Victorian Yeast Substitute - Homemade Bread

In the Victorian era, yeast was sometimes made at home. The last days I tried out another Victorian yeast substitute recipe. The other Victorian yeast substitute was made with fresh hops, this homemade yeast just needs flour, sugar and water. I made two different yeast starter: one with white flour, and one with whole wheat flour. Continue reading Victorian Yeast Substitute

10 Victorian Bread Recipes Without Commercial Yeast

Victorian bread recipes without commercial yeast and without sourdough starter – you don’t need commercial yeast to bake a loaf of bread! In the Victorian era it was quite common to make yeast substitutes at home. Here you’ll find 8 recipes for homemade yeast substitutes: hop yeast, fruit yeast, grape must yeast, flour yeast sponge, pea yeast, bark yeast & salt rising bread.

Victorian Bread Recipes Without Commercial Yeast

I often make homemade sourdough bread, but since I made Victorian Graham bread (with commercial yeast) for the Historical Food Fortnightly two month ago, I was interested in historical homemade bread recipes which were made without commercial yeast. So here I compiled Victorian bread recipes which are all made without commercial yeast and without traditional homemade sourdough starter.

‘Home-made liquid yeast is exceedingly easy to prepare. It simply requires a mixture of water and some material in which the plant cells will rapidly grow.’ (A Handbook Of Invalid Cooking, 1893)

In the Victorian era, yeast was usually made at home with boiled hops and mashed potatoes. But nearly all Victorian yeast recipes made with hops say to add some commercial yeast as well; but finally I found two Victorian yeast recipes without commercial yeast, which you’ll find below. There are also recipes for Victorian salt-risen bread, Roman bread made with grape must, Turkish pea bread and Siberian bark bread. Continue reading 10 Victorian Bread Recipes Without Commercial Yeast

Victorian Campfire Damper Recipe – Historical Food Fortnightly

Victorian Damper Recipe - Historical Food Fortnightly

Damper is an unleavened flat bread made with flour and water, which is baked in the hot ashes of a wood fire. Australian damper is called bannock or ash cake in the USA. Damper is easy to make as part of a cowboy or lumberjack breakfast.

Bacon & eggs, Victorian damper with black tea, all cooked over an open fire, is my entry for challenge 8 – Literary Foods – of the Historical Food Fortnightly. Continue reading Victorian Campfire Damper Recipe – Historical Food Fortnightly

Hardtack As Dog Food – Historical Food Fortnightly

Hardtack Recipe - Historical Food Fortnightly

Hardtack,  also called ship’s biscuit, is a hard cracker made with flour and water. It was used on long sea voyages, and soldiers in the American Civil War were sometimes supplied with hardtack rations instead of flour. But hardtack is also an early form of dog food: ‘Dog-biscuit is a hard and well-baked mass of coarse, yet clean and wholesome flour, of an inferior kind to that known as sailors’ biscuit; and this latter substance, indeed, would be the best substitute’ (The Quarterly Journal of Agriculture, 1841, p. 244).

Hardtack will keep much longer than flour (in museums there’s still hardtack which is over hundred years old! 😮 )- so it’s my entry for the Historical Food Fortnightly challenge 12 (food preservation). Continue reading Hardtack As Dog Food – Historical Food Fortnightly

Victorian (1850s) Graham Bread Recipe – Historical Food Fortnightly

Victorian Graham bread made from scratch – so easy to make and so delicious!

Victorian Graham Bread Recipe

Graham bread is named after reverend Sylvester Graham, who invented the bread in 1829. Victorians preferred white bread bought at the bakery because homemade brown bread was considered backward – a bread eaten by poor peasants. In the Victorian era, Graham bread was promoted as ‘health bread’ since Victorian white bread wasn’t made with white flour but with bleached whole wheat flour. Continue reading Victorian (1850s) Graham Bread Recipe – Historical Food Fortnightly