Tag Archives: embroidery

Edwardian Lingerie Dress

Edwardian Lingerie Dress

‘Time to think of the cool, sweet mornings and their gowns of crisp figured lawn; time to think of the drowsy afternoons with their hammock dresses of voile taffeta, mull and batiste; time to think of the summer evenings and their veilings, their silvered chiffons, their wonderful tissues and their transparencies. Time to think of summer dress!’ (San Francisco Call, 1903)

I started my Edwardian lingerie dress about 10 years ago and I’m so glad that it’s finally finished! 😀 Despite the name, an Edwardian lingerie dress is a proper dress for summer wear: it was usually made of thin cotton or silk fabrics and was embellished with lots of lace inserts, pintucks and ruffles. In the 1900s, it was called “lingerie dress” because it was inspired by Edwardian lingerie with its lace, frills and sheer fabrics. A lingerie dress is the typical dress that you would wear to an afternoon garden party in the Edwardian era! Continue reading Edwardian Lingerie Dress

How To Make Edwardian Net Applique

How To Make Edwardian Net Applique Lace Applique Tutorial

Net applique, with cotton bobbinet tulle or cotton Valenciennes lace, was very popular in the Edwardian era. In the 1900s, it was used to embellish clothing, especially underwear.

To make Edwardian net applique, you baste a piece of cotton tulle or lace to fabric, cut the fabric away behind the net and then attach the net with satin or other embroidery stitches. Continue reading How To Make Edwardian Net Applique

Hand-Embroidered Edwardian Eyelet Lace Camisole

Hand Embroidered Edwardian Eyelet Lace Camisole

I’ve been wanting to make an Edwardian hand-embroidered eyelet lace camisole from scratch for a long time and now I’ve finally made one! Yay! 😀 I embroidered the camisole by hand, carefully cut along the embroidered scallops and then hand sewed the side seams together with Edwardian hemmed fell seams.

Eyelet lace – aka broderie anglaise – is a historical cutwork and whitework embroidery. Broderie anglaise looks beautiful, isn’t too difficult to make but takes ages to embroider! 😉 That’s why it took me a few years to finally finish my hand-embroidered Edwardian eyelet lace camisole! Continue reading Hand-Embroidered Edwardian Eyelet Lace Camisole

Edwardian Punched Work – Pulled Thread Embroidery

How To Make Edwardian Punched Work Pulled Thread Embroidery Tutorial

Punched work looks like drawn thread work but it’s much quicker to make because you don’t actually have to draw out threads! 😀 Punched work – also called Rhodes embroidery, pierced work or four-sided stitch – is a pulled thread embroidery from the Edwardian era. Continue reading Edwardian Punched Work – Pulled Thread Embroidery

How To Make Hedebo Embroidery – Basic Stitches

How To Make Hedebo Embroidery

Hedebo embroidery is a historical open work or whitework embroidery which originated in Denmark in the mid-18th century. Hedebo embroidery (hedebo means heathland) can be rather geometric or very floral or a combination of both. There are two basic embroidery stitches used in hedebo lace: buttonhole and overhand stitch. Continue reading How To Make Hedebo Embroidery – Basic Stitches

18th Century Embroidered Stomacher

18th Century Embroidered Stomacher

I’ve always wanted to have an 18th century embroidered stomacher and now I actually made two! 😀 One of my 18th century stomachers is hand-embroidered and the other is machine-embroidered on my old treadle sewing machine. In addition, both stomacher are reversible: so I have four 18th century stomacher now. Continue reading 18th Century Embroidered Stomacher

How To Make Fabric Soutache

How To Make Fabric Soutache

Soutache – also know as Russia braid – is used to embellish clothes. Soutache was especially popular in the Victorian and Edwardian era.

But instead of using store-bought soutache you can also make your own soutache with fabric. DIY fabric soutache is really easy to make. And you can use almost any fabric. I like to use rayon or cellulose acetate lining fabrics to make fabric soutache because it’s cheap, shiny, not too thick and made of natural materials. Continue reading How To Make Fabric Soutache