Tag Archives: 18th century

Turn Leggings Into Stockings – Refashion Tutorial

Turn Leggings Into Stockings - Refashion Tutorial

Today I turned my old leggings into stockings. It’s perfect to repurpose ill-fitting, outgrown tights or old leggings with holes along the seams – no need to throw them away! I’ve written a tutorial, so you can also refashion your old leggings into thigh high stockings. Continue reading Turn Leggings Into Stockings – Refashion Tutorial

10 Victorian Bread Recipes Without Commercial Yeast

Victorian bread recipes without commercial yeast and without sourdough starter – you don’t need commercial yeast to bake a loaf of bread! In the Victorian era it was quite common to make yeast substitutes at home. Here you’ll find 8 recipes for homemade yeast substitutes: hop yeast, fruit yeast, grape must yeast, flour yeast sponge, pea yeast, bark yeast & salt rising bread.

Victorian Bread Recipes Without Commercial Yeast

I often make homemade sourdough bread, but since I made Victorian Graham bread (with commercial yeast) for the Historical Food Fortnightly two month ago, I was interested in historical homemade bread recipes which were made without commercial yeast. So here I compiled Victorian bread recipes which are all made without commercial yeast and without traditional homemade sourdough starter.

‘Home-made liquid yeast is exceedingly easy to prepare. It simply requires a mixture of water and some material in which the plant cells will rapidly grow.’ (A Handbook Of Invalid Cooking, 1893)

In the Victorian era, yeast was usually made at home with boiled hops and mashed potatoes. But nearly all Victorian yeast recipes made with hops say to add some commercial yeast as well; but finally I found two Victorian yeast recipes without commercial yeast, which you’ll find below. There are also recipes for Victorian salt-risen bread, Roman bread made with grape must, Turkish pea bread and Siberian bark bread. Continue reading 10 Victorian Bread Recipes Without Commercial Yeast

Heavenly Sky-blue (Or Blood-red) Summer Sauce – Historical Food Fortnightly

Medieval Blackberry Sauce Recipe - Heavenly Sky-blue (Or Blood-red) Summer Sauce - Historical Food Fortnightly

For the Historical Food Fortnightly challenge 18 – ‘Let’s get saucy!’ I tried to make  a medieval natural blue sauce. I found the recipe in different languages all over the internet: in French it’s called ‘Sauce bleu céleste d’été’, and in English ‘Heavenly sky-blue summer sauce’ or ‘Summertime cerulean blue sauce‘. It’s a 1450s or 1460s recipe from the book ‘Libro de arte coquinaria’ by Maestro Martino, which is the most influential cookbook in the 15th century. The cookbook contains mainly sauce recipes, and it’s the first book which mentions a piece of cloth to strain sauces. The cookbook is written in Latin and the recipe I’m now making is called: ‘Sapor celeste de estate’. Continue reading Heavenly Sky-blue (Or Blood-red) Summer Sauce – Historical Food Fortnightly

Victorian Nettle Beer And Kvass – Small Beer Recipes – Historical Food Fortnightly

Victorian Nettle Beer And Kvass - Small Beer Recipes - Historical Food Fortnightly

For the Historical Food Fortnightly challenge 17 – Myths and Legends, I made small beer. Small beer was drunk in medieval Europe instead of water, as water wasn’t safe to drink. Small beer contains less alcohol than beer; it was homemade; drunk by all, even children and servants, and the consistency was sometimes rather like porridge. Small beer is mentioned in “The Three Heads of the Well” by Joseph Jacobs published in English Fairy Tales in 1890: The king’s daughter says to the old man: ‘In my bag I have got bread and cheese, and in my bottle good small beer. Would you like to have some?’ Continue reading Victorian Nettle Beer And Kvass – Small Beer Recipes – Historical Food Fortnightly

16th Or 17th C. Braided Hairstyle – Tutorial

16th Or 17th Braided Hairstyle - Tutorial

This medieval braided updo is suitable for a 16th or 17th century lower class woman. 16th and 17th century lower class women always wore their hair covered with a coif, so it’s not easy to know how they dressed their hair, but they might have worn a similar braided updo according to these two 16th century paintings – a great source about 16th/17th century hairstyles + free coif patterns.

The braid hairstyle is made without hairties or hairpins! Continue reading 16th Or 17th C. Braided Hairstyle – Tutorial