Men’s Shirt To Edwardian Blouse Refashion

This refashioned Edwardian blouse is totally wearable today: With Edwardian underwear it’s an Edwardian shirtwaist but without it’s just a cotton summer blouse!

Men's Shirt To Edwardian Blouse Refashion

This is my third men’s shirt refashion but this time I didn’t turn it into a top or blouse. I made an Edwardian shirtwaist instead! In the Edwardian era, blouses were usually called shirtwaists. The shirtwaist costume – cotton blouse plus wool skirt – was a favorite costume of the Edwardian summer girl and the Edwardian business woman. Shirtwaist were worn for work, for sports, in summer and winter!

Related: The Edwardian Summer Girl

Edwardian Summer Dress

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Men’s Shirt To Edwardian Blouse Refashion

The Before

I used one of my grandfather’s shirts. It’s a slightly sheer, off-white 100% cotton shirt with stripes. Perfect for an Edwardian shirtwaist! The self-stripes mimic pintucks: Pintucked and tucked shirtwaists were very popular in the Edwardian era.

Tucks [are] more fashionable than ever. This shirt waist is made of white lawn and is entirely tucked, front and sleeves.’ (Los Angeles Herald, 1900)

Edwardian Blouse Men's Shirt Refashion

Related: Keep Your Home Cool In The Summer Heat – Edwardian Decor Ideas

The Inspiration

I wanted to make a 1903 or 1904 shirtwaist. Early Edwardian shirtwaist had wide bishops sleeves, like this beautiful Edwardian lace shirtwaist.

Related: 1900-1909 Edwardian Fashion Timeline

‘The sleeves are the favorite ones that are snug above and full below the elbows.‘ (Los Angeles Herald, 1904)

More Edwardian blouses and shirtwaist on my pinterest boards:

-> Edwardian Shirtwaist Costumes

-> 1900s Fashion & Accessories

Men's Shirt To Woman's Blouse Refashion Tutorial

The Pattern

I used my usual self-drafted shirtwaist pattern for my refashioned Edwardian blouse which is based on this 1916 shirtwaist pattern.

Related: Dressing The 1900s Woman – Edwardian Lingerie

‘The secret of good shirt waist making is to have the back snug, so says a famous shirt waist maker, and to have the front loose and inclined to blouse at the waist.

The French modistes with their fondness for the snug-fitting waist cannot bring themselves to the point of making the blouse shirt waist, and this is the reason why the French shirt waist is so rarely a success.

But with the American shirt waist maker it is different, and some of the newest waists have a very handsome back, snug as any tailored dress, while the front is very full and very blouse.’ (San Francisco Call, 1903)

The Sleeves

The refashioned Edwardian blouse has elbow-length sleeves because I didn’t have enough fabric left for long sleeves. But Edwardian summer blouses often had elbow-length sleeves.

The shirt waist girl of the future will wear elbow sleeves if she has a pretty arm‘ (Los Angeles Herald, 1902).

These two Edwardian shirtwaist with elbow-length sleeves were my inspiration: photograph of a young woman with her parents and postcard of a woman with lion cubs.

Men's Shirt To Vintage Blouse Refashion

It wasn’t easy to turn the tight shirt sleeves into wide Edwardian bishop sleeves. Luckily, I had a bit of vintage lace-like fabric in my stash with a similar color and fabric weight which I inserted into the back of the sleeves.

And I also turned the sleeves around so that the original shoulder seams are now gathered into the cuff!

Sleeves ‘are notably fuller […] the fullness of the sleeve has gone boldly up from the wrist, where the puff was always more or less in the way – and considerably more than less, as many can testify – and located itself at the elbow’ (Los Angeles Herald, 1904).

The Collar

My refashioned Edwardian blouse has a buttoned standing collar. High standing collars were fashionable in the Edwardian era. Sometimes the collars were separate from the shirtwaists and sometimes they were joined. Edwardian collars were either fastened with buttons or fastened with a stud.

Related: Edwardian Tailored Wool Skirt & Linen Shirtwaist

Refashioned Edwardian Blouse Standing Collar Detail

The Seams

All seams are finished with flat felled seams – the favorite seam finish for Edwardian shirtwaists – except for the sleeve seams.

‘The felled seam is a very flat seam made by turning in and hemming, or stitching flat, one overlapping edge of a seam. […] it is sometimes made on the right side of a garment. […]

The felled seam is used any place where a flat seam is desired. […] Any garment which is worn next to the skin should be finished with this seam.’ (School Sewing Based On Home Problems, 1916)

Related: Handkerchief To Top Refashion – Edwardian Handkerchief Camisole

First, I finished the sleeves seams with felled seams as well but it created too much bulk. It also stiffened the sleeves so that they didn’t drape well. So I had to unpick the seams again – I hate unpicking! 😉

So I finished the sleeve seams with overcast stitches by hand instead. Overcast seams were another popular Edwardian seam finish.

‘All articles and garments having raw edges inside should be finished by overcasting before laying them aside.’ (A Sewing Course For Teachers, 1893)

Edwardian Shirtwaist Costume

‘While not a tailored seam, it is used at times in tailored skirts where one wishes to have the seam invisible […] When so used, it is stitched, bastings removed, and the edges overcast together, or the seams opened and each edge overcast separately.’ (Clothing For Women: Selection, Design, Construction, 1916)

Here are two pictures of antique Edwardian garments with overcast seams: the inside of an Edwardian tea gown and an Edwardian slip. The overcast seam is one of my favorite seam finishes – I’ve already used it for my Edwardian gingham wash dress. A hand overcast seam doesn’t take much longer than a machine finished seam and it’s historically accurate.

Edwardian Striped Skirt

Here I’m wearing my refashioned Edwardian blouse with the skirt of my Edwardian gingham wash dress.

Related: Edwardian Pink Gingham Wash Dress

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