Category Archives: Themes Across Eras

Here you’ll find topics and articles across different eras, from the 18th century to the Victorian and Edwardian era to the 1920.

10 Ways How To Get Rid Of Moths & Carpet Beetles Naturally – Historical & Today

How to prevent moths from eating clothes? How to get rid of moths and carpet beetles? Are you wondering how to store your expensive vintage and historical wool clothes to keep them save from moths? And how did the Victorians prevent moths damage to clothes and carpets? Find out how to prevent and get rid of moths and carpet beetles effectively and naturally!

10 Ways How To Get Rid Of Moths & Carpet Beetles Naturally - Historical Tips & Today - How To Stop Moths From Eating Your Clothes

If you find holes in your woolen clothes, you know you have a problem with fabric pests! There are two main insect species that damage woolen clothes: clothes moths and carpet beetles. The larvae of moths and carpet beetles eat irregular holes into wool clothes, especially in the summertime.

Clothes moths, as well as carpet beetles, can do serious damage to expensive and valuable historical wool clothes. Continue reading 10 Ways How To Get Rid Of Moths & Carpet Beetles Naturally – Historical & Today

10 Victorian Christmas Gift Wrapping Ideas

10 festive DIY Christmas gift wrapping ideas from the Victorian era.

10 Victorian Christmas Gift Wrapping Ideas

‘Christmas presents must be wrapped very daintily this season’ (The Guthrie Daily Leader, 1909).

The traditional colors for Victorian Christmas gift wrapping were white and red: either white paper with red ribbon, or red paper with Christmas ribbons. But the Victorians also knew fun ways to wrap small gifts or give money as a gift: Victorian Christmas gifts were disguised as faux snowballs, Christmas crackers or even sausages! Continue reading 10 Victorian Christmas Gift Wrapping Ideas

How To Clean A Corset

How To Clean A Corset

How To Clean A Corset

‘Give your corset air and sunshine if you want it sweet and odorless. You should not expect the best results from your corset without a second one to wear alternately. Any corset needs a rest; two corsets worn alternately will give more satisfaction and service than the same two corsets, each worn continuously until they are worn out, just as two or three pairs of shoes last longer when worn alternately. Continue reading How To Clean A Corset

History Of Lingerie – Victorian, Edwardian & 1920s

If you’ve ever wondered what underthings Victorian ladies and 1920s flappers wore, you’ve come to the right place. Find out more about the history of lingerie!

History Of Lingerie - Victorian, Edwardian & 1920s

What kind of underwear did Edwardian ladies, Victorian working class women and 1920s flappers wear? Although the terms didn’t change much between the Victorian era and the 1920s, the look of the lingerie changed dramatically. While Victorian women wore a chemise next to their skin, 1920s women wore a teddy instead. But even if the terms are different, the function was the same: to protect the body from the corset and vice versa. Yes, contrary to popular belief, 1920s women still wore corsets!

In general, Victorian women wore the most underwear, especially before the invention of the crinoline – while 1920s flapper preferred to wear only the bare necessities. Victorian women wore a chemise, drawers, corset, corset cover, and many petticoats. 1920s women, on the contrary, often wore only two pieces of lingerie: a teddy and slip.

Underwear might seem less important than the dress but the right underwear provides the foundation and right silhouette for the dress. Continue reading History Of Lingerie – Victorian, Edwardian & 1920s

Dressing The 1900s Woman – Edwardian Lingerie

Edwardian Lingerie - Dressing The Edwardian Lady

In the Edwardian era, a matronly figure was fashionable: The typical Gibson girl S-shaped, curvy figure with low mono-bosom bust and ample hips.

The right lingerie ‘improves the fit and set of skirt and gown in wonderful degree’ (W. B. Erect Form Corsets, 1902).

The Edwardian era lasted from 1901 to 1910 and was an era of luxury with expensive fabrics and lavish lace trimmings. Even if lingerie was almost never seen Continue reading Dressing The 1900s Woman – Edwardian Lingerie

1900-1909 Edwardian Fashion Timeline

1900-1909 Edwardian Fashion Timeline

The Edwardian era covers the short reign of King Edward VII and lasted from 1901 to 1910. It was an era of luxury with elegant dresses, expensive fabrics and trimmings. Even lingerie was lavishly trimmed with rows of lace for the first time in history! Moreover, Edwardian fashion was characterized by the new S-bend corset, the pouter pigeon shape, high collars and hats. While high collars and hats remained popular throughout the era, the pouter pigeon shape decreased over the years. Continue reading 1900-1909 Edwardian Fashion Timeline

200+ Historical DIY Natural Beauty Products

200+ DIY natural beauty products & hair care products – made and loved for centuries! It’s easy and fun to make your own DIY natural beauty products at home!

200+ Historical DIY Natural Beauty Products Hair Care Routine

Victorian and Edwardian women wanted to look their best. But makeup and beauty products weren’t always readily available. So they made their own DIY natural beauty products at home.

Learn to make your own makeup, kohl, lip balm, blush, tooth paste, shampoo, hairspray and much more! It’s easier than you’d think to make your own DIY natural beauty products and it’s so much fun!

Continue reading 200+ Historical DIY Natural Beauty Products

Dressing The 1920s Woman – 1920s Lingerie

Dressing The 1920s Woman 1920s Lingerie

Compared to 1900s lingerie, 1920s lingerie looks completely different but women still wore the same kind of underwear: chemises, drawers, camisoles, bras, girdles and corsets. Yes, most women in the 1920s still wore corsets! However, Edwardian lingerie emphasized a curvy silhouette, whereas 1920s underwear created a slender, boyish look. Continue reading Dressing The 1920s Woman – 1920s Lingerie

How To Make Hay With A Scythe – History Of Haymaking

How To Make Hay With A Scythe - History Of Haymaking
The Haymaker, Julien Dupré, 1890s

 

In the Victorian era, hay was made by hand with a scythe. But even today, a scythe is often used to cut grass and make hay. I love making hay with a scythe – it’s the best full body workout! Every summer, I make hay for our rabbits by hand with a scythe. Besides haymaking, the scythe is also perfect to cut grass on a hill in our garden that is too steep for a lawn mower.

‘Now, whilst the mowers are whetting their scythes, and the fragrant smell of the hay fills the summer air, let us sit on the haycock, and glance at the flowers around us.’ (English Wild Flowers, 1868)

Continue reading How To Make Hay With A Scythe – History Of Haymaking

Victorian & Edwardian Travel Accessories

Victorian & Edwardian Travel Accessories
‘It is a delightful experience to sit in a comfortable, two-horse victoria at the door of the Hotel Toblach, while the driver gathers up the reins preparatory to starting either for Cortina or for the charming intermediate halting-places – Schluderbach and Landro. […] Huge domes and spires, really miles away, seemed close at hand; and like the desert air in purity was the breeze which now and then swept downward from them to refresh us as we drove along.’ (The Dolomites, 1901)

Victorians and Edwardians were fond of traveling. ‘The Grand Tour’ – a travel through European countries – was a popular travel to finish the education of wealthy young adults. Italy and Greece were the most popular travel destinations, and some even traveled to the Far East! The advent of the railroad and steamships in the Victorian era made traveling much easier. In the Victorian era, there were already unchaperoned traveling women, such as Ida Pfeiffer – the travel blogger of the Victorian era! 😉 Continue reading Victorian & Edwardian Travel Accessories