All posts by Lina

History Of Lingerie – Victorian, Edwardian & 1920s

If you’ve ever wondered what underthings Victorian ladies and 1920s flappers wore, you’ve come to the right place. Find out more about the history of lingerie!

History Of Lingerie - Victorian, Edwardian & 1920s

What kind of underwear did Edwardian ladies, Victorian working class women and 1920s flappers wear? Although the terms didn’t change much between the Victorian era and the 1920s, the look of the lingerie changed dramatically. While Victorian women wore a chemise next to their skin, 1920s women wore a teddy instead. But even if the terms are different, the function was the same: to protect the body from the corset and vice versa. Yes, contrary to popular belief, 1920s women still wore corsets!

In general, Victorian women wore the most underwear, especially before the invention of the crinoline – while 1920s flapper preferred to wear only the bare necessities. Victorian women wore a chemise, drawers, corset, corset cover, and many petticoats. 1920s women, on the contrary, often wore only two pieces of lingerie: a teddy and slip.

Underwear might seem less important than the dress but the right underwear provides the foundation and right silhouette for the dress. Continue reading History Of Lingerie – Victorian, Edwardian & 1920s

Dressing The 1900s Woman – Edwardian Lingerie

Edwardian Lingerie - Dressing The Edwardian Lady

In the Edwardian era, a matronly figure was fashionable: The typical Gibson girl S-shaped, curvy figure with low mono-bosom bust and ample hips.

The right lingerie ‘improves the fit and set of skirt and gown in wonderful degree’ (W. B. Erect Form Corsets, 1902).

The Edwardian era lasted from 1901 to 1910 and was an era of luxury with expensive fabrics and lavish lace trimmings. Even if lingerie was almost never seen Continue reading Dressing The 1900s Woman – Edwardian Lingerie

1900-1909 Edwardian Fashion Timeline

1900-1909 Edwardian Fashion Timeline

The Edwardian era covers the short reign of King Edward VII and lasted from 1901 to 1910. It was an era of luxury with elegant dresses, expensive fabrics and trimmings. Even lingerie was lavishly trimmed with rows of lace for the first time in history! Moreover, Edwardian fashion was characterized by the new S-bend corset, the pouter pigeon shape, high collars and hats. While high collars and hats remained popular throughout the era, the pouter pigeon shape decreased over the years. Continue reading 1900-1909 Edwardian Fashion Timeline

22 DIY Denim Dog Toys – Recycled From Old Jeans!

22 DIY denim dog toys – all made from old jeans! These recycled DIY denim dog toys are simple and fun to make, cheap and eco-friendly, and your dog will love them!

22 DIY Denim Dog Toys - Recycled From Old Jeans!

Making your own dog toys is really easy, cheap and fun! So don’t throw away your old jeans, turn them into these cute, recycled DIY denim dog toys!

These 22 simple DIY dog toys are all Khaleesi-approved! Khaleesi is my 1-year old black GSD puppy! 😉 And all of these DIY recycled dog toys can easily be tossed into the washer when needed. Continue reading 22 DIY Denim Dog Toys – Recycled From Old Jeans!

DIY Recycled Denim Baseball – Tutorial & Free Pattern

This DIY recycled denim baseball is made from old jeans! A fun, easy, cheap and eco-friendly way to upcycle your jeans!

DIY Recycled Denim Baseball - Tutorial

Make this recycled denim baseball as soft fabric ball for your baby or toddler, for your cat or dog. It’s the perfect toy for a dog that loves to fetch – like my GSD pup Khaleesi! The recycled denim baseball is a safe alternative to the usual tennis ball. Continue reading DIY Recycled Denim Baseball – Tutorial & Free Pattern

How To Make Limerick Lace By Hand

Limerick lace is a floral tulle lace: It is hand-embroidered on machine-made cotton net. In this tutorial I’ll show you the basics of Limerick lace.

How To Make Limerick Tulle Lace By Hand

Limerick lace was made since 1829 in Limerick, Ireland, hence the name Limerick lace. There are two types of this beautiful, delicate lace: Limerick lace can be either worked as needle-run or tambour lace. In needle-run lace, the net ground is embroidered with a needle and darning stitches. Whereas in tambour lace, the net ground is embroidered with chain stitches and a tambour hook which is similar to a crochet hook. Usually, needle-run lace is more delicate than tambour lace, while some Limerick tulle laces use a combination of needle-run and tambour. Continue reading How To Make Limerick Lace By Hand